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Community in Colorado: A Confluence of Cultures

Added by yongli on 09/13/2017 - 15:27, last changed on 11/08/2017 - 11:03
One popular vision of Colorado presents a region of open spaces where a lone man rides into the setting sun. He is strong, silent, and through individual effort manages to save the girl, bring in the cattle, and haul the “bad guys” off to jail, all before the credits roll. This is the individualist...

Adolph Coors

Added by yongli on 02/03/2017 - 21:43, last changed on 09/17/2017 - 01:07
Adolph Coors (1847–1929) immigrated to the United States in 1868 after serving as a brewery apprentice in western Germany and then in the Kingdom of Prussia. After working in Chicago breweries, he moved to Colorado in 1872 and purchased a bottling company. He transformed it into the Coors Brewing...

AIDS in Colorado

Added by yongli on 03/30/2017 - 13:58, last changed on 08/30/2017 - 01:07
HIV/AIDS represents one of the greatest public health crises of the latter half of the twentieth century and the first half of the twenty-first century. The disease affects thousands of families in Colorado alone and has motivated a public response unlike any other in the last fifty years. Today,...

Alan Berg

Added by yongli on 08/30/2016 - 10:34, last changed on 08/25/2017 - 07:36
Alan Berg (1934–84) was an outspoken Denver radio broadcaster in the 1970s and 1980s known for his unapologetic attacks on the far right, religious extremism, and white supremacy. At the time of his assassination by the white supremacist group The Order in 1984, Berg was one of Denver ’s most...

Anna and Eugenia Kennicott

Added by yongli on 01/18/2017 - 15:49, last changed on 08/25/2017 - 07:36
Anna (1887–1963) and Eugenia Kennicott (1883–1934) grew up on a Colorado farm around the turn of the twentieth century and recorded their day-to-day lives in diaries and in rare photographic plates. Today, their chronicles of women’s experiences on a turn-of-the-century farm in the American west...

Arthur Carhart

Added by yongli on 05/06/2016 - 14:37, last changed on 11/17/2017 - 13:05
Arthur Hawthorne Carhart (1892–1978) was a novelist, US Forest Service (USFS) official, and landscape architect known for developing a commonsense, nonpartisan, and democratic approach to conservation and natural resource management. His legacy lives on today in the Arthur Carhart National...

Beaver Creek Resort

Added by yongli on 11/19/2015 - 16:28, last changed on 11/08/2017 - 01:07
Tucked away in Colorado’s Rocky Mountains, Beaver Creek Resort has had a rich history since it first opened to the public in 1980. Located in Eagle County , Beaver Creek is a major ski resort owned and operated by Vail Associates. The valley that houses Beaver Creek Resort lies just south of Avon...

Caribou Ranch Recording Studio

Added by yongli on 11/16/2015 - 13:07, last changed on 08/25/2017 - 08:27
The famed Caribou Ranch recording studio, located near Nederland, Colorado, existed for about fifteen years from 1971 to 1985. During its brief history, the recording studio became a destination for dozens of famed musicians and performers, including Michael Jackson, Joe Walsh, Billy Joel, and John...

Caroline Bancroft

Added by yongli on 05/13/2016 - 16:32, last changed on 11/10/2017 - 01:07
Caroline Bancroft (1900–85) was a prominent author, journalist, organizer, and socialite in twentieth-century Denver. Bancroft’s extensive writings on Colorado’s local history established the importance of the genre and served as an example for generations of historians who followed in her...

Carrie Welton

Added by yongli on 08/15/2016 - 14:33, last changed on 10/17/2017 - 08:39
Carrie Welton (1842–84) was a relatively well-known socialite and amateur mountaineer who climbed Colorado Fourteeners in the 1880s. When Welton perished during an ill-advised autumn ascent of Longs Peak in 1884, she became the focal point of a national discussion concerning backcountry safety and...

Charles Deaton

Added by yongli on 08/30/2016 - 11:17, last changed on 10/25/2017 - 13:48
Charles Deaton was an influential western American architect best known for his Sculptured House (better known as the Sleeper House ) in the hills around Denver . Deaton is remembered as a pioneering Colorado artist whose work was an example of architecture’s shifting visual aesthetic in the mid-...

Cheyenne Mountain

Added by yongli on 11/20/2015 - 09:58, last changed on 08/31/2017 - 01:07
Cheyenne Mountain, a geographical landmark southwest of Colorado Springs, is known for such famous attractions as the Broadmoor Hotel , the Cheyenne Mountain Zoo , and, more recently, a bunker underneath it housing the North American Aerospace Defense Command . The Cheyenne Mountain...

Civilian Conservation Corps in Colorado

Added by yongli on 08/02/2016 - 16:40, last changed on 08/25/2017 - 08:38
The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) was a New Deal program aimed at reducing unemployment among young men by giving them steady work improving the nation’s landscape, public lands, and infrastructure. When it was implemented in 1933, the CCC was the largest-ever public works program. Today, the...

Colorado Avalanche

Added by yongli on 09/21/2016 - 16:01, last changed on 08/29/2017 - 08:07
The Colorado Avalanche, based in Denver , is the only National Hockey League (NHL) team in Colorado, competing in the Central Division of the league’s Western Conference. Formerly the Quebec Nordiques, the team arrived in Denver in 1995 and won the Stanley Cup—the NHL title—in its first season as...

Colorado Poetry

Added by yongli on 09/30/2016 - 10:47, last changed on 09/27/2017 - 01:07
In 2007 Mary Crow, Colorado Poet Laureate from 1996–2010, wrote a “Poetic History of Colorado” suggesting five basic areas of Colorado poetry: “Western,” Chicano, Beat, performance, and experimental poetry. This essay leans on those themes she identified, with some additional thoughts. ...

Colorado Rockies

Added by yongli on 02/02/2017 - 15:54, last changed on 10/24/2017 - 10:29
The Colorado Rockies arrived in Denver in 1993 and is the only professional baseball team in the Rocky Mountain West. The Rockies compete in Major League Baseball’s National League West Division. Having made the MLB playoffs three times in their short history, the Rockies lost to the Boston Red Sox...

Columbine Massacre

Added by yongli on 06/24/2016 - 16:15, last changed on 08/25/2017 - 18:01
The massacre at Columbine High School in 1999 was, at the time, one of the worst school shootings perpetrated in the United States. Fifteen people, including the two shooters, were killed. In the months and years following the tragedy, discussions about public safety, access to firearms, and the...

Dale H. Maple

Added by yongli on 01/17/2017 - 13:59, last changed on 08/25/2017 - 18:01
Private First Class Dale H. Maple (1920–2001) was stationed at Camp Hale near Leadville during World War II when he assisted in the escape of three German prisoners-of-war prisoners of war in February 1944. Following Maple’s arrest along with the escapees in Mexico, he underwent one of the most...

Damon Runyon

Added by yongli on 08/15/2016 - 16:02, last changed on 08/25/2017 - 18:16
Damon Runyon (1880–1946) was a newspaperman, political reporter, author, screenwriter, and playwright in the early 1900s. Best known for his work after leaving Colorado, particularly Guys and Dolls , Runyon was a prolific writer during his time in Colorado, working for many of the state’s...

Dean Reed

Added by yongli on 06/15/2016 - 16:00, last changed on 08/25/2017 - 18:16
Dean Reed (1938–86) was a singer-songwriter and actor from Denver who enjoyed a stint of popularity in the 1960s and 1970s before experiencing a slow slide into obscurity by the end of his life. Best known for his time spent living and recording in the Soviet Union at the height of the Cold War,...

Denver Broncos

Added by yongli on 08/03/2016 - 13:38, last changed on 08/31/2017 - 01:07
Like many other Americans, Coloradans have embraced organized professional sports since the very beginning of their state’s establishment. It is hardly surprising that Denver is now home to professional baseball, basketball, hockey, lacrosse, soccer, and even rugby teams. But the city and state’s...

Denver Nuggets

Added by yongli on 02/22/2017 - 12:08, last changed on 09/03/2017 - 01:07
The Denver Nuggets, Colorado’s professional basketball team, compete in the National Basketball Association (NBA) as part of the Northwest Division in the association’s Western Conference. While an amateur-league team named the Denver Nuggets competed in the 1930s and 1940s, the current Nuggets...

Dinosaur National Monument

Added by yongli on 10/22/2015 - 12:22, last changed on 10/28/2017 - 01:07
Located southeast of the Uinta Mountains at the confluence of the Yampa and Green Rivers on the Utah-Colorado border, Dinosaur National Monument is a federally protected area where dinosaur fossils can be found. The monument is one of the few places in the United States where such fossils can still...

Dr. Florence Rena Sabin

Added by yongli on 08/11/2016 - 15:42, last changed on 10/25/2017 - 13:33
One of the preeminent medical and scientific minds of the early twentieth century, Dr. Florence Rena Sabin (1871–1953) was a public servant devoted to improving public health. As the first woman to receive a full professorship at Johns Hopkins University, Sabin was also a successful woman in the...

Dr. Stanley Biber

Added by yongli on 08/30/2016 - 12:30, last changed on 08/25/2017 - 20:18
Stanley Biber (1923–2006) was a surgeon in Trinidad during the twentieth century who specialized in sex reassignment surgeries. His clinic, one of the first in the country to offer sex reassignment surgeries, grew in reputation thanks to its compassionate treatment of transsexual patients. Biber’s...

Emily Elizabeth Wilson

Added by yongli on 08/30/2016 - 12:37, last changed on 08/25/2017 - 20:33
Emily Elizabeth “Emmy” Wilson (1902–63) was a well-known Colorado business owner, entrepreneur, and socialite who ran the Glory Hole Tavern, a popular establishment in Central City . Wilson and her tavern played an integral role in reviving the ex-mining town’s social and cultural scene, and for...

Fort Collins

Added by yongli on 09/13/2017 - 14:46, last changed on 11/08/2017 - 10:15
Fort Collins, the fourth-most populous city in Colorado, lies along the Cache la Poudre River near the foothills of the northern Front Range . The seat of Larimer County , Fort Collins was founded as an Army camp in 1864 and has since developed into a regional hub for education, business, culture,...

Frank P. Marugg

Added by yongli on 08/31/2016 - 11:28, last changed on 10/26/2017 - 10:54
Frank Marugg (1887–1973) was an inventor who developed the “Denver Boot,” a device that immobilizes a vehicle for ticketing purposes. Despite a lifetime of pursuits in various other industries, the boot remains the most notable achievement of Marugg’s professional career. Still, his life story...

Gary Hart

Added by yongli on 09/13/2017 - 15:13, last changed on 09/13/2017 - 17:39
Gary Hart (1936 –) is a former US Senator from Colorado, serving from 1975 to 1987, and two-time presidential hopeful who became embroiled in one of the first modern political sex scandals. The so-called “Monkey Business” scandal set the tone for future media coverage of politicians’ personal lives...

Gene Cervi

Added by yongli on 03/30/2017 - 13:54, last changed on 08/30/2017 - 01:07
Gene Cervi (1906–70) was an influential Denver newspaperman, publisher, and politician who published one of the first business weeklies in the western United States. Known for his probing insights, razor wit, and short temper, Cervi’s journalism and political activism shaped Denver’s economic and...

Golden

Added by yongli on 11/16/2015 - 14:11, last changed on 09/15/2017 - 01:07
Now a small pocket city in the suburbs of Denver , Golden was once the most powerful city in the state and the capital of the Colorado Territory . Today, Golden is known for the Coors Brewery and the Colorado School of Mines and as the seat of Jefferson County . Over the years, a variety of...

Gray Goose Airways

Added by yongli on 08/31/2016 - 13:31, last changed on 08/25/2017 - 20:47
Denver’s history is full of innovation and success associated with the emergence of air travel, but perhaps just as many ventures failed. Though Gray Goose Airways was ultimately unsuccessful, founder Jonathan Edward Caldwell was doggedly persistent in its development and displayed an unwavering...

Gumry Hotel Explosion

Added by yongli on 08/31/2016 - 13:43, last changed on 08/25/2017 - 20:47
On August 19, 1895, a steam boiler exploded in Denver’s Gumry Hotel, killing twenty-two people and injuring dozens. Hotel fires were not uncommon in nineteenth-century Colorado, but the Gumry explosion was the worst hotel disaster in Colorado history and prompted a complete rewrite of boiler...

Harry Buckwalter

Added by yongli on 05/06/2016 - 14:14, last changed on 10/24/2017 - 08:46
Photojournalist, radio reporter, and film producer Harry Buckwalter (1867–1930) is considered Colorado’s first photojournalist. He was also one of the great technological innovators of the nineteenth- and early twentieth-century American West, known for his advances in X-ray photography, early...

Harry Tuft

Added by yongli on 03/31/2017 - 14:51, last changed on 08/26/2017 - 15:02
Harry Tuft (1935–) is a Denver businessman, music promoter, educator, and proprietor of the long-standing Denver Folklore Center . As one of Denver’s enterprising musicians in the 1960s and 1970s, Tuft brought the genre of folk music and its culture to Denver and was responsible for some of Red...

Henrietta “Nettie” Bromwell

Added by yongli on 09/21/2016 - 14:13, last changed on 08/26/2017 - 15:02
Henrietta “Nettie” Bromwell (1859–1946) was a prominent artist and author active in Denver’s social scene during the early to mid-1900s. In addition to her artistic success, she was a Denver socialite. Today, Bromwell’s legacy is her writings and artwork, especially landscape paintings. Early Life...

Homeopathy in Colorado

Added by yongli on 01/18/2017 - 14:03, last changed on 08/26/2017 - 15:02
Homeopathy is a quasi-science espousing the treatment of maladies using small doses of poisonous or toxic substances. The practice was very popular throughout the United States and the world at large from the late-1700s to the early 1900s. Its popularity in Colorado Territory , and later the state...

Horace Tabor

Added by yongli on 08/20/2015 - 13:32, last changed on 10/31/2017 - 08:56
Horace “Silver King” Tabor (1830–99) rose from a smalltime prospector to one of the wealthiest men in Colorado because of his luck in Leadville’s silver mines. He became tabloid fodder through his romantic liaisons with Baby Doe Tabor and his fall from power when the United States changed to the...

Interstate 70

Added by yongli on 11/19/2015 - 16:17, last changed on 10/23/2017 - 01:07
Interstate Highway 70 spans 2,100 miles across the United States, crossing the entire state of Colorado. The eastern end of the highway lies west of Baltimore, Maryland. From there it bisects the country until it reaches Cove Fort in Central Utah, where it merges into Interstate 15. In Colorado, I-...

John W. Gunnison

Added by yongli on 08/02/2016 - 16:26, last changed on 08/26/2017 - 15:28
John Williams Gunnison (1812–53) was a nineteenth-century US Army officer and explorer. In 1853 he was charged with finding a railroad route across the Rocky Mountains, and while carrying out his mission he explored the Western Slope of Colorado. His expedition moved on to Utah, where he was killed...

Julie Penrose

Added by yongli on 08/21/2015 - 12:35, last changed on 11/15/2017 - 13:21
Julie Villiers Lewis McMillan Penrose (1870–1956) was one of the primary benefactors of Colorado Springs institutions in the interwar years. Her husband, multimillionaire Spencer (“Speck”) Penrose , profited from Cripple Creek gold and Utah copper in the early twentieth century. He used his wealth...

Koshare Scouts

Added by yongli on 11/16/2015 - 12:55, last changed on 08/29/2017 - 08:07
The Koshare Scouts is primarily made up of Boy Scout troop 2230 in La Junta , Otero County , that has studied Native American lore and performed tribal rituals since the 1930s. This imitative white group is part of a long American history of “playing Indian.” In the twentieth century, groups like...

Lynching in Colorado

Added by yongli on 11/19/2015 - 16:13, last changed on 08/26/2017 - 16:15
Lynching, a form of vigilante punishment involving mob execution, has an active history in Colorado. Between 1859 and 1919, Coloradans carried out 175 lynchings. Lynching is usually associated with the Reconstruction Era in the American South, but before Colorado’s statehood in 1876, lynching was...

Manitou and Pikes Peak Cog Railway

Added by yongli on 08/21/2015 - 15:16, last changed on 08/26/2017 - 16:15
The Manitou and Pikes Peak Cog Railway climbs the 8.9 miles to the 14,110-foot summit of Pikes Peak . The railway is the highest in North America and was built as a tourist attraction in the late nineteenth century. Other cog railways can be found on Mt. Washington in New Hampshire and throughout...

Mari Sandoz

Added by yongli on 08/12/2016 - 15:07, last changed on 08/26/2017 - 16:15
Mari Sandoz (1896–1966) was a popular author in the early- to mid-twentieth century whose works of both fiction and non-fiction focused on life in the Rocky Mountain West. Sandoz’s work represents some of the most widely read literature concerning the American West and has done much to influence...

Max Goldberg

Added by yongli on 08/15/2016 - 16:08, last changed on 08/26/2017 - 16:15
Max Goldberg (1911–72) was a pioneer of early television broadcasting and a television personality in the 1950s and 1960s. Goldberg worked to promote the growth of television in Denver , and his weekly talk show On the Spot set the stage for television’s early success in the local market. Today,...

Minnie Reynolds Scalabrino

Added by yongli on 05/16/2016 - 11:48, last changed on 11/08/2017 - 12:08
Minnie Reynolds Scalabrino (1865–1936) was a newspaperwoman, candidate for political office, and lifelong suffragette in the late nineteenth century and early twentieth. She played an important role in the women’s suffrage movement in Colorado and worked tirelessly in other states to secure the...

Mistanta (Owl Woman)

Added by yongli on 11/16/2015 - 13:44, last changed on 11/03/2017 - 11:54
Mistanta (Mis-stan-stur, ca. 1810–47), also known as Owl Woman, was the Southern Cheyenne wife of the American trader William Bent . Born about 1810, she is credited with helping maintain good relations between the white settlers and the Native Americans of the Colorado plains . As the eldest...

NORAD

Added by yongli on 01/04/2016 - 15:49, last changed on 11/15/2017 - 01:07
Built at the height of the Cold War, the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) collects all data and information concerning air activity in North America. Currently located near the Colorado Springs Municipal Airport on Peterson Air Force Base, NORAD houses a command center to monitor...

Painter Family

Added by yongli on 01/23/2017 - 11:00, last changed on 08/27/2017 - 09:17
The Painter was a prosperous ranching family in Colorado during the early 1900s. Even though ranching went into universal decline following a brutal winter in 1886, the Painter family remained successful due to equal parts luck, persistence, and scientific management of their cattle herds. They...

Pueblo Chemical Depot

Added by yongli on 11/20/2015 - 09:17, last changed on 09/17/2017 - 01:07
Pueblo Chemical Depot was established in 1942 as the Pueblo Ordnance Depot. The facility’s mission has changed over the years, from starting with receiving, storing, and issuing general supplies of ammunition during World War II, to later handling the disposal of munitions. Today, the depot’s...

Ralph Carr

Added by yongli on 10/06/2016 - 16:46, last changed on 11/17/2017 - 09:43
Ralph Lawrence Carr (1887–1950) was governor of Colorado from 1939 to 1943. Carr is remembered for his outspoken criticism of the federal government’s internment of Japanese Americans during World War II, even though a regional concentration camp, Amache , operated inside his state’s borders. His...

Rev. John O. Ferris

Added by yongli on 09/21/2016 - 14:49, last changed on 08/31/2017 - 06:26
The Reverend John O. Ferris (d. 1942) was a spiritual leader in Trinidad during the Coalfield War and Ludlow Massacre of 1914. Ferris was one of the few people permitted to search the ruined Ludlow tent city for the bodies of slain miners, women, and children, and his account of the days after the...

Robert S. Roeschlaub

Added by yongli on 05/16/2016 - 15:04, last changed on 09/17/2017 - 01:07
Robert Roeschlaub (1843–1923) was Colorado’s first officially licensed architect, working in Denver during the early settlement era. Roeschlaub played a central role in defining the city’s building code, which has affected the development of Denver’s built environment through the present. Today,...

Ruth Underhill

Added by yongli on 05/16/2016 - 15:40, last changed on 08/31/2017 - 06:35
Ruth Underhill (1883–1984) was a prominent anthropologist in the mid- to-late twentieth century, and one of the first female anthropologists to reach the stature regularly enjoyed by male colleagues. As a professor at the University of Denver later in life, Underhill published dozens of works on...

Saco Rienk DeBoer

Added by yongli on 05/16/2016 - 15:54, last changed on 08/31/2017 - 06:35
Saco Rienk DeBoer (1883–1974) was a prolific Denver -based landscape architect and city planner in the early twentieth century. DeBoer played a significant role in the development of Denver’s built environment, particularly the city’s parks and the establishment of its zoning codes. His work...

Sadie Likens

Added by yongli on 09/21/2016 - 15:16, last changed on 10/17/2017 - 11:12
Sadie Likens (c. 1840–1920) was a prominent officer of the court in Denver’s formative period, served as Colorado’s first prison matron, and was also known for her charitable work on behalf of the Women’s Christian Temperance Union and other women’s organizations. Before losing her job as prison...

Spencer Penrose

Added by yongli on 08/21/2015 - 14:19, last changed on 09/19/2017 - 01:07
Spencer Penrose (1865–1939) was a businessman, miner, entrepreneur, philanthropist, and investor who worked primarily in the Pikes Peak region. Penrose had assets in Colorado, Utah, Arizona, and Kansas, including mines and real estate properties. He is most notable for owning the C.O.D. mine in...

St. Luke’s Hospital

Added by yongli on 10/06/2016 - 16:52, last changed on 09/26/2017 - 01:07
St. Luke’s Hospital was a Denver fixture for over a century, serving the community as one of several hospitals in the capitol. St. Luke’s role in training several generations of doctors and nurses garners historical significance for the building complex. Today, only one of the hospital’s buildings...

State Folk Dance

Greg Vogl's picture
Added by Greg Vogl on 02/17/2015 - 17:33, last changed on 09/22/2017 - 01:07
The Square Dance was adopted as the official state folk dance on March 16, 1992 by an act of the General Assembly. Square dancing is the American folk dance which traces its ancestry to the English country dance and the French ballroom dance, and which is called, cued, or prompted to the dancers...

Swedish National Sanatorium

Added by yongli on 09/21/2016 - 15:39, last changed on 08/31/2017 - 07:25
The Swedish National Sanatorium in Denver was a tuberculosis treatment center active throughout the 1900s. As tuberculosis swept the nation, thousands of consumptives turned to the dry mountain air of Colorado to alleviate their symptoms, and sanatoriums sprang up across the state. The Swedish...

Tabor Grand Opera House

Added by yongli on 02/22/2017 - 12:00, last changed on 08/31/2017 - 07:25
The Tabor Grand Opera House, constructed by the state’s famed Tabor family, was one of the city’s primary cultural institutions during the late 1800s. The Grand Opera enjoyed a period of popularity and success before falling by the wayside, a story that paralleled the fate of the Tabor family...

Telluride

Added by yongli on 11/16/2015 - 13:24, last changed on 11/08/2017 - 11:28
Telluride is a small town located in the San Juan range of the Rocky Mountains. It is the county seat of San Miguel County . Like many other mountain towns, it was founded as a mining center in 1878. Originally, it was named “Columbia,” but in order to avoid being mistaken for a town in California...

The First National Western Stock Show

Added by yongli on 08/03/2016 - 10:56, last changed on 11/08/2017 - 10:48
The origins of Denver ’s annual National Western Stock Show, today one of the city’s biggest tourism draws, date to 1898, a time when American cities competed for the attention of various national organizations in the hope of hosting conventions to bring in revenue. The first stock show helped...

The Hilltop Bomber Crash

Added by yongli on 01/18/2017 - 13:56, last changed on 11/17/2017 - 11:41
In 1951, a B-29 Superfortress taking off from Lowry Air Force Base crashed in Denver’s Hilltop neighborhood. As the smoke cleared, the deadly crash illustrated the need for better safety procedures at military bases near residential areas and the necessity of regulating the expansion of military...

The Tenth Mountain Division

Added by yongli on 11/16/2015 - 13:11, last changed on 08/31/2017 - 07:32
The Tenth Mountain Division (hereafter, the Tenth), was US Army division created in 1941. The Allies took notice of a Finnish division of soldiers on skis that defeated and embarrassed a larger and better-equipped invading Soviet force during the Winter War of 1939. Inspired by Finland’s success,...

The “Nude” Silks-Fulton Duel

Added by yongli on 09/21/2016 - 14:28, last changed on 10/17/2017 - 08:59
The so-called Nude Duel was a legend that sprouted from a drunken brawl involving two well-known madams—Mattie Silks and Kate Fulton—at Denver Gardens in 1877. Although the original accounts of the fight are hardly remarkable, the story took on a life of its own thanks to the diligent exaggerations...

Thomas E. Ketchum

Added by yongli on 09/21/2016 - 15:46, last changed on 08/31/2017 - 07:32
Thomas “Black Jack” Ketchum was a famous outlaw in the late 1800s who, along with his brother Sam and their gang, was responsible for a number of high-profile robberies and murders. While his criminal career achieved great notoriety, it was Ketchum’s eventual hanging, which was badly botched by New...

United States Air Force Academy

Added by yongli on 11/19/2015 - 15:23, last changed on 11/08/2017 - 01:07
Established in April 1954, the United States Air Force Academy occupies 18,000 acres on the north end of Colorado Springs. It serves as an air force base and undergraduate college for officer candidates. The academy currently enrolls 4,000 cadets as undergraduates, employs 723 faculty members, and...

Walter Paepcke

Added by yongli on 11/16/2015 - 12:59, last changed on 09/19/2017 - 01:07
Walter P. Paepcke, a Chicago businessman, was pivotal in developing Aspen into a resort known for its exceptional skiing and as a hub for intellectuals, artists, politicians, and celebrities. Paepcke’s efforts have made Aspen stand out among Colorado’s many ski towns and resorts. Born...

Wichita State University Plane Crash

Added by yongli on 10/03/2016 - 12:07, last changed on 08/31/2017 - 08:08
In early October 1970, a twin-engine aircraft carrying forty people associated with the Wichita State University football team crashed into Mt. Bethel along Colorado’s Continental Divide , killing thirty-one passengers. The crash spurred the Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) to review and revise its...

William F. “Buffalo Bill” Cody

Added by yongli on 09/21/2016 - 16:06, last changed on 09/15/2017 - 01:07
William F. “Buffalo Bill” Cody (1846–1917) was neither born in Colorado nor lived in the state. In death, however, he became one of its most famous residents. Cody’s first experience in Colorado came in 1859, when he was a thirteen-year-old participant in the Colorado Gold Rush . Like many other...

William Jackson Palmer

Added by yongli on 08/01/2016 - 13:33, last changed on 11/17/2017 - 12:56
William Jackson Palmer (1836–1909) was a Civil War general, railroad tycoon, and founder of Colorado Springs . Though a Quaker from Delaware, Palmer fought for the Union Army during the Civil War. After the war, he moved west and became a civil engineer and philanthropist who played an integral...

William “Bat” Masterson

Added by yongli on 01/17/2017 - 13:06, last changed on 11/03/2017 - 13:07
William Barclay “Bat” Masterson (1853–1921) was a US marshal whose life and work in the American west during the mid-to-late 1800s granted him legendary status in the region’s folklore. In Colorado, where he spent several years during the 1880s, Masterson’s run-ins with the law and other important...

William “Cement Bill” Williams

Added by yongli on 08/15/2016 - 15:55, last changed on 09/15/2017 - 01:07
William “Cement Bill” Williams (1868–1945) was a prominent contractor, political agitator, and personality in Golden during the early 1900s. Williams’s tireless campaigning brought crucial road construction to Golden, much of which he built himself. Today, Williams’s legacy as a businessman and the...

Women in Early Colorado

Added by yongli on 05/06/2016 - 15:01, last changed on 11/17/2017 - 11:58
In nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Colorado, women’s labor was often vital to a family’s economic survival. Historian Katherine Harris demonstrated in her study of Logan and Washington Counties that women’s earnings from butter, eggs, and the garden often provided much of a farm family’s...

Women of the Ku Klux Klan

Added by yongli on 09/12/2017 - 10:57, last changed on 09/13/2017 - 17:39
Membership in the Ku Klux Klan (KKK) spiked nationwide during the 1920s, and Colorado was no exception to the hysteria of nativism and religious prejudice that swept the country. Following World War I , national KKK recruiters helped local agitators form a men’s KKK in Colorado. The women’s...

Women's Suffrage Movement

Added by yongli on 05/06/2016 - 15:15, last changed on 11/15/2017 - 11:11
The women’s suffrage movement was a sociopolitical movement in the late nineteenth century that secured voting rights for Colorado women by state referendum in 1893. The movement’s success made Colorado the first state to enact women’s suffrage by popular referendum. Origins On July 4, 1876,...
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