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Charles Burrell

Added by yongli on 02/08/2021 - 16:17, last changed on 02/09/2021 - 13:39
Charles Burrell (1920–) is a classical and jazz musician who first joined the Denver Symphony in 1949 and played bass with the group for decades before his retirement in 1999. Sometimes called the “Jackie Robinson of classical music,” he was not actually the first Black classical musician in Denver...

Chin Lin Sou

Added by yongli on 02/16/2021 - 13:54, last changed on 02/16/2021 - 13:54
Cantonese immigrant Chin Lin Sou (1836–94) defied racial barriers to establish himself as an esteemed business and civic leader in Colorado. Not only do historians recognize Chin and his wife as the first Chinese American family in Colorado, but Chin and his descendants also established a positive...

Chipeta

Added by yongli on 01/16/2020 - 15:32, last changed on 04/20/2021 - 13:40

Chipeta

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Chipeta (1843–1924) was a Ute woman known for her intelligence, judgment, empathy, bravery, and quiet strength, all of which made her the only woman of her time allowed on the Ute council. She was also the wife of Ouray , whom the United States recognized as the de facto Ute leader in the late...

Clara Brown

Added by yongli on 08/20/2019 - 14:48, last changed on 04/20/2021 - 13:48
Clara Brown (c. 1803–85) was an ex-slave who became a philanthropist, entrepreneur, and humanitarian in Denver and Central City . She is said to be the first African American woman to have traveled West during the Colorado Gold Rush . While in Central City, she established Gilpin County ’s first...

Denver’s Chinatown

Added by yongli on 08/30/2016 - 11:27, last changed on 10/31/2019 - 09:04
For economic reasons, as well as to protect themselves from an Anglo-American culture that mostly viewed them with contempt, Denver ’s Chinese residents established an ethnic enclave in the city around 1870. The neighborhood endured decades of racially motivated violence and other forms of abuse,...

Elizabeth Ensley

Added by yongli on 06/18/2021 - 15:56, last changed on 07/06/2021 - 13:44
Elizabeth Piper Ensley (1847–1919) was a political activist and reformer who worked throughout her life for gender and racial equality. The daughter and wife of formerly enslaved people, she came to Colorado in 1887 and soon helped lead the first successful campaign for statewide women’s suffrage...

Ellison Onizuka

Added by yongli on 01/31/2017 - 10:17, last changed on 04/01/2020 - 01:07
Ellison Onizuka (1946–86) was an astronaut for the US Space Shuttle program who earned degrees at the University of Colorado in Boulder before perishing in the 1986 Challenger shuttle disaster. Onizuka was Colorado’s highest-profile astronaut and is remembered today as an advocate for science...

Elvin R. Caldwell

Added by yongli on 05/02/2017 - 10:38, last changed on 04/19/2021 - 16:02
Elvin R. Caldwell Sr. (1919–2004) was one of the most significant African American policymakers in Colorado history. An accountant and businessman, Caldwell joined many community organizations before beginning his political career in 1950 in the Colorado House of Representatives. He later served on...

Five Points

Added by yongli on 08/29/2016 - 14:40, last changed on 10/29/2019 - 11:07
Bordered roughly by the South Platte River to the northwest, Thirty-Eighth Street to the north, Downing Street to the east, Park Avenue and East Twentieth Avenue to the south, and Twentieth Street to the southwest, Five Points is a historic neighborhood near downtown Denver that was home to the...

Garveyism in Colorado

Added by yongli on 06/19/2018 - 13:12, last changed on 10/03/2019 - 12:08
Marcus M. Garvey (1887–1940) was president of the Universal Negro Improvement Association and African Communities League (UNIA-ACL), an organization that offered hope to millions of African people in the United States and worldwide. In the early twentieth century, Garvey had large followings in...

Granada War Relocation Center (Amache)

Added by yongli on 01/30/2017 - 10:01, last changed on 12/28/2018 - 16:20
The federal government built the Granada War Relocation Center, also known as Camp Amache, after the bombing of Pearl Harbor to imprison Japanese Americans during World War II. Fearing that Japanese Americans might sympathize with Japan and work against the United States during the war, the federal...

Immigration to Denver, 1920–Present

Added by yongli on 02/08/2021 - 15:57, last changed on 03/15/2021 - 01:07
Beginning in the 1920s, immigration to Denver underwent several significant changes owing to war, economic depression, and evolving civil rights legislation and related social tensions. Movements of people due to World War II , Japanese internment, changing agricultural landscapes, the Civil Rights...

Jack Bradley

Added by yongli on 02/08/2021 - 16:51, last changed on 02/09/2021 - 13:36
Jack Bradley (1919–2000) was a violinist who became one of the first Black members of a major professional orchestra in the United States as well as the first Black member of the Denver Symphony Orchestra when he played with the group from 1946 to 1949. Bradley came up through the Denver Symphony’s...

Jewish Colony at Cotopaxi

Added by yongli on 10/06/2016 - 16:43, last changed on 11/07/2019 - 12:28
In 1882 a group of Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe settled at the Cotopaxi Colony. The colony was the result of persistent efforts by several prominent American Jews and Jewish organizations to offer a better life for those fleeing the Pale of Settlement in the western region of Imperial...

Justina Ford

Added by yongli on 01/18/2017 - 15:12, last changed on 11/19/2019 - 09:46
Justina L. Ford (1871–1952) was a medical pioneer and Denver ’s first licensed African American female doctor. Ford is best known for her obstetrics and pediatric work in Denver’s Five Points community. Patients knew Dr. Ford as “the Baby Doctor,” and it is estimated that she delivered over 7,000...

Nisei Sisters

Added by yongli on 09/29/2016 - 14:39, last changed on 08/16/2018 - 01:07
Three of the Shitara sisters, known in the contemporary press as “the Nisei Sisters,” were prisoners at the Amache concentration camp who helped two Germans escape from a nearby prisoner-of-war camp. During their trial, the third treason trial of World War II, the sisters’ race, class, and sex all...

Oliver Toussaint Jackson

Added by yongli on 09/29/2016 - 14:47, last changed on 11/11/2019 - 10:24
Oliver Toussaint “O. T.” Jackson (1862–1948) was an entrepreneur and prominent member of black communities in Denver and Boulder during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. In 1910 he founded Dearfield , an-all black agricultural settlement some twenty-five miles southeast of Greeley...

Rodolfo “Corky” Gonzales

Added by yongli on 01/17/2017 - 12:33, last changed on 02/19/2020 - 09:50
Rodolfo “Corky” Gonzales (1928–2005) was a prominent figure in the Chicano Movement in Denver in the 1960s and 1970s. He also had ties to the greater Civil Rights Movement. In addition to his activist work, Gonzales had multifaceted careers in boxing, politics, and poetry, and left a lasting legacy...

Saul Halyve

Added by yongli on 08/12/2016 - 16:20, last changed on 12/29/2017 - 08:02
Saul Halyve was a Hopi distance-running champion raised near Grand Junction who exploded onto the athletic scene in the early 1900s. Although Halyve would never compete in an Olympics due to a multitude of factors, his accomplishments match and possibly surpass those of other famous Native American...

The Denver Woman’s Press Club

Added by yongli on 06/21/2016 - 14:53, last changed on 11/28/2020 - 01:07
The Denver Woman’s Press Club is an organization for women newspaper writers and authors founded in 1898. At the time of its founding, the club demonstrated the new social and political power of women through its involvement in a range of causes, including the women’s suffrage movement in the early...
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