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Teller County

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  • Strike

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    The Western Federation of Miners went on strike in 1903, sparking a bitter fifteen-month struggle with mine owners and the Colorado National Guard. Many died and hundreds of union members were deported in one of the most violent labor disturbances in state history.
    Strike
  • Teller County

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    Teller County, named for US Senator Henry M. Teller, was formed in 1889 to alleviate tension between wealthy mine owners in Colorado Springs (El Paso County) and working-class miners in Victor and Cripple Creek.
    Teller County
  • Teller County on Google Map

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    Teller County encompasses 559 square miles of the western flank of Pikes Peak and the southern Front Range. Its county seat is Cripple Creek, the site of the last great gold rush in Colorado history, as well as the only current gold-mining operation in the state. 
    Teller County on Google Map
  • Fremont

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    After prospectors started moving to the Mount Pisgah area in 1891, two separate towns—Fremont and Hayden Placer—soon took shape. After about a year the towns merged to form Cripple Creek.
    Fremont
  • Victor Avenue, 1900

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    The Teller County town of Victor was home to dozens of mining ventures during the Cripple Creek Gold Rush of the 1890s. This photo shows Victor Avenue at Third Street, as it appeared a year after the great Victor fire, which destroyed much of the city.
    Victor Avenue, 1900
  • Cripple Creek, 1980s

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    Mining declined in the Cripple Creek district throughout the first two-thirds of the twentieth century, leaving only 2,000 people left in the area. At the end of the 1980s, residents turned to gambling as a way to develop the local economy and generate revenue for preservation.
    Cripple Creek, 1980s

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