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Ludlow Massacre

  • Ludlow Strikers, 1914

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    Striking coal miners and their families gather at the Ludlow tent colony during the United Mine Workers' strike of 1914. Governor Elias Ammons deployed the National Guard to quell the strike, and a pitched battle between strikers and guardsmen broke out on April 20. Guardsmen burned the tent colony, and nineteen people, including more than a dozen women and children, were killed before day's end.
    Ludlow Strikers, 1914
  • Ruins of Ludlow Tent Colony

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    Smoldering frames and debris were all that remained of the Ludlow tent colony after National Guardsmen burned it down during the Ludlow Massacre on April 20, 1914. The colony had housed coal miners and their families, and more than a dozen women and children suffocated during the conflagration.
    Ruins of Ludlow Tent Colony
  • Memorial Service for Ludlow Victims

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    Coffins carrying the victims of the Ludlow Massacre are brought to the Catholic Church in Trinidad as hundreds of mourners look on. At least nineteen people, including thirteen women and children, were killed in the massacre.
    Memorial Service for Ludlow Victims
  • National Guardsmen at Ludlow Colony

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    Two National Guardsmen pose with rifles in the burned tent colony of Ludlow shortly after the massacre in 1914. The guardsmen, who were sent in by Governor Elias Ammons to keep peace during a strike between the United Mine Workers and Colorado Fuel & Iron, instead helped instigate the massacre on April 20 and burned the colony. Thirteen women and children died in the blaze.
    National Guardsmen at Ludlow Colony
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