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Paleoindians

Clovis

Added by yongli on 12/06/2017 - 13:59, last changed on 11/11/2019 - 11:02
The term Clovis refers to the earliest widespread archaeological culture to have occupied North and Central America, ca. 13,250–12,800 years ago. Since the discovery of the first Clovis artifacts in the 1930s, debate has raged over such fundamental issues as whether people who left behind Clovis...

Dent Site

Added by yongli on 05/09/2016 - 15:35, last changed on 11/04/2019 - 12:33
Early colonists occupied Colorado’s rich and ecologically diverse landscapes in the waning millennia of our planet’s most recent major Ice Age, the Pleistocene, between 14,000 and 12,000 years. Our best-documented evidence for Colorado’s earliest hunter and gatherer inhabitants, people we call...

Flattop Butte

Added by yongli on 08/24/2016 - 15:52, last changed on 10/16/2019 - 12:36
Located northwest of Sterling , Flattop Butte is a rock outcrop that was used extensively by prehistoric peoples as a source of stone for tools. The butte has a Chadron Formation capstone that is the only major bedrock source of high-quality stone between central Kansas/Nebraska and the Rocky...

Folsom People

Added by yongli on 06/22/2016 - 14:59, last changed on 10/10/2019 - 10:14
Folsom groups, also called Folsom peoples or Folsom culture , occupied all of Colorado between about 13,000 and 12,000 years ago. They were not the first people in these areas, although they might have been the first in some newly unglaciated portions of the high Rockies. Nevertheless, Folsom...

Gordon Creek Burial Site

Added by yongli on 05/25/2016 - 13:08, last changed on 11/11/2019 - 12:42
Discovered in 1963, the Gordon Creek Burial Site is a Paleo-Indian burial in the Roosevelt National Forest in north-central Colorado. The site, which dates to about 7700 BCE, contained the skeleton of a young woman and several artifacts apparently buried with her. Recently the site has been...

Hannah Marie Wormington

Added by yongli on 11/19/2015 - 16:19, last changed on 10/10/2019 - 10:07
As a pioneering woman in a field dominated by men, Hannah Marie Wormington (1914–94) carved a scholarly niche for herself on the frontiers of American archaeology. She was a larger-than-life figure whose impact went far beyond the dozens of publications she produced to include mentorship for many...

Jones-Miller Bison Kill Site

Added by yongli on 06/02/2017 - 14:09, last changed on 10/08/2019 - 08:32
Located in a shallow draw near the Arikaree River in eastern Colorado, the Jones-Miller Bison Kill Site was discovered in 1972 by the rancher Robert B. Jones Jr. and excavated over the next three years by Dennis Stanford of the Smithsonian Institution. Containing the bones of more than 300 bison,...

Jurgens Archaeological Site

Added by yongli on 05/19/2017 - 16:47, last changed on 11/11/2019 - 11:06
The Jurgens Archaeological Site is a Paleo-Indian period (before 6000 BCE) bison processing site that dates to about 7120 BCE and includes the remains of at least sixty-eight bison spread across three separate camps. Located about nine miles east of Greeley near the South Platte River , the site...

Lamb Spring Archaeological Site

Added by yongli on 08/24/2016 - 16:26, last changed on 11/11/2019 - 10:23
Located in Douglas County southeast of Chatfield State Park, the Lamb Spring Archaeological Site is the only major site with Paleo-Indian (before 6000 BCE) deposits in the metropolitan Denver area. First excavated in 1961–62, the site contains bison and mammoth bones from the Paleo-Indian period,...

Olsen-Chubbuck Bison Kill Site

Added by yongli on 06/02/2017 - 14:37, last changed on 08/29/2017 - 08:04
Dating to roughly 8200 BCE, the Olsen-Chubbuck Bison Kill Site in Cheyenne County preserves evidence of a Paleo-Indian kill of more than 190 bison. The site was named for the amateur archaeologists Jerry Chubbuck and Sigurd Olsen, who discovered and partially excavated the site in 1957–58 before...

Paleo-Indian Period

Added by yongli on 05/02/2016 - 14:08, last changed on 11/11/2019 - 12:43
The Paleo-Indian period is the era from the end of the Pleistocene (the last Ice Age) to about 9,000 years ago (7000 BC), during which the first people migrated to North and South America. This period is seen through a glass darkly: Paleo-Indian sites are few and scattered, and the material from...

Radiocarbon Dating

Added by yongli on 05/02/2016 - 16:39, last changed on 10/08/2019 - 13:46
Radiocarbon dating is the most common technique used in ascertaining the age of archaeological and paleontological sites during the last 45,000 years. Developed by a chemist born in Colorado, there are now commercial and academic laboratories across the globe that conduct radiocarbon dating...
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