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Chief Ouray

Brunot Agreement

Added by yongli on 05/18/2016 - 14:41, last changed on 11/24/2020 - 10:25
The Brunot Agreement between the Utes and the US government in 1873 led to the development of mining in the San Juan Mountains by taking 3.7 million acres (about 5,780 square miles) from the Ute Reservation in western Colorado. As white encroachment continued over the next decade, the Utes were...

Chipeta

Added by yongli on 01/16/2020 - 15:32, last changed on 04/20/2021 - 13:40
Chipeta (1843–1924) was a Ute woman known for her intelligence, judgment, empathy, bravery, and quiet strength, all of which made her the only woman of her time allowed on the Ute council. She was also the wife of Ouray , whom the United States recognized as the de facto Ute leader in the late...

Otto Mears

Added by yongli on 01/16/2020 - 16:13, last changed on 03/16/2021 - 01:07
Otto Mears (1840–1931) was a Colorado businessman who played a key role in the removal of the state’s Ute Indians and is best known for building more than 450 miles of toll roads and railroads on the Utes’ former lands in the southern and southwestern parts of the state. Called the “Pathfinder of...

Ouray

Added by yongli on 02/03/2017 - 11:37, last changed on 04/01/2020 - 11:48
Ouray (1833–80), whose name means “Arrow” in the Ute language, was a leader of the Tabeguache (Uncompahgre) band of Ute Indians in Colorado during the late nineteenth century. Even though Ouray had no ultimate authority over Colorado’s Utes and spoke little English, the US government assigned him...

Ute Indian Museum

Added by yongli on 12/05/2017 - 16:26, last changed on 04/29/2020 - 01:07
The Ute people , or as they call themselves, Nuche (The People), are Colorado’s longest continuous residents. Their rich cultural heritage and history is on display at the Ute Indian Museum. Nestled in the heart of traditional Uncompahgre Ute territory in Montrose , the Ute Indian Museum is History...
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