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1908 Democratic National Convention

Added by yongli on 08/30/2016 - 10:23, last changed on 09/17/2017 - 09:22
In 1908 the Democratic Party held its national convention in Denver to nominate candidates for president and vice president. The 1908 convention was the political culmination of a half-century of development in the city and the last time Denver would host the convention until 2008. It also marked...

1976 Winter Olympics

Added by yongli on 07/29/2016 - 11:15, last changed on 08/25/2017 - 07:36

Denver Olympic Logo

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In the early 1960s, Governor John A. Love and other business leaders worked to bring the 1976 Winter Olympics to Colorado. Despite winning the bid from the International Olympic Committee in 1970, the voters of Colorado decided not to fund the winter games, causing the event to be moved to...

AIDS in Colorado

Added by yongli on 03/30/2017 - 13:58, last changed on 08/30/2017 - 01:07
HIV/AIDS represents one of the greatest public health crises of the latter half of the twentieth century and the first half of the twenty-first century. The disease affects thousands of families in Colorado alone and has motivated a public response unlike any other in the last fifty years. Today,...

Beaver Creek Massacre

Added by yongli on 11/05/2015 - 10:35, last changed on 08/29/2017 - 08:07
The Beaver Creek Massacre occurred on June 19, 1885, when white cattlemen killed six Ute Mountain Utes at a camp on Beaver Creek, about sixteen miles north of Dolores in present Montezuma County . Stemming from conflicts over the federal government’s Native American policies and the Utes’ off-...

Boulder Flood of 1894

Added by yongli on 08/15/2016 - 14:28, last changed on 08/25/2017 - 08:27
The 1894 Boulder flood was a natural disaster that reshaped the landscape of Boulder County , wiping out some communities and forcing others to come together to rebuild. Like other extreme weather events, the 1894 deluge played an integral role in the development of the affected communities. Some,...

Brunot Agreement

Added by yongli on 05/18/2016 - 14:41, last changed on 08/29/2017 - 08:07
The Brunot Agreement between the Utes and the US government in 1873 opened the San Juan Mountains to mining by removing 3.7 million acres (about 5,780 square miles) from the Ute Reservation in western Colorado. Though it removed a large amount of land from the reservation, the agreement still left...

Colorado Gold Rush

Added by yongli on 05/06/2016 - 14:50, last changed on 09/14/2017 - 01:07
The discovery of gold near present-day Denver in 1858–59 drew thousands of people to present-day Colorado, prompting the political organization of first a US territory and later a state. Many current cities and towns, including Denver , Boulder , Black Hawk , Breckenridge , and Central City , were...

Colorado in World War I

Added by yongli on 09/13/2017 - 14:17, last changed on 09/13/2017 - 17:39
As Europe stumbled into war in late July and early August 1914, Coloradans viewed the conflict with mixed emotions. Some favored the English, French, Italians, Russians, and their allies. Others preferred the Germans and Austrians and their friends. The divisions were predictable. The 1910 federal...

Columbine Massacre

Added by yongli on 06/24/2016 - 16:15, last changed on 08/25/2017 - 18:01
The massacre at Columbine High School in 1999 was, at the time, one of the worst school shootings perpetrated in the United States. Fifteen people, including the two shooters, were killed. In the months and years following the tragedy, discussions about public safety, access to firearms, and the...

Cotopaxi Train Robbery

Added by yongli on 08/15/2016 - 15:57, last changed on 08/25/2017 - 18:01
The 1891 Cotopaxi train robbery typified a new era of crime in the American West—robbing trains carrying railroad and federal property—and set off one of the highest-profile manhunts of the era. The robbers, Peg Leg Watson and Bert Curtis, took thousands of dollars in cash and gold bars from a...

Denver Tramway Strike of 1920

Added by yongli on 08/11/2016 - 13:15, last changed on 09/13/2017 - 17:39
The Denver Tramway Strike of 1920 typified the active militancy of many labor unions during the early 1900s. The strike brought the conversation surrounding labor relations to the forefront of Denver politics and would influence the larger labor landscape for decades to come. Today the strike is...

Flooding in Colorado

Added by yongli on 08/15/2016 - 16:19, last changed on 09/03/2017 - 01:07
Coloradans have maintained a complex relationship with the natural process of flooding. On one hand, inhabitants of the arid West—from early indigenous communities to current metropolitan populations—have been attracted to the many resources floodplains provide. On the other hand, periodic...

Gumry Hotel Explosion

Added by yongli on 08/31/2016 - 13:43, last changed on 08/25/2017 - 20:47
On August 19, 1895, a steam boiler exploded in Denver’s Gumry Hotel, killing twenty-two people and injuring dozens. Hotel fires were not uncommon in nineteenth-century Colorado, but the Gumry explosion was the worst hotel disaster in Colorado history and prompted a complete rewrite of boiler...

Indian Annuities

Added by yongli on 04/27/2017 - 16:36, last changed on 08/26/2017 - 15:28
Annuities were a fixed sum of money or goods that the US government paid to Native Americans on a regular basis for the sale of Indian lands. Treaties with Native Americans typically specified payments to tribes in dollar amounts over a period of years in return for land cessions. The payments were...

Ludlow Massacre

Added by yongli on 09/29/2016 - 16:39, last changed on 09/01/2017 - 01:07
The Ludlow Massacre began on the morning of April 20, 1914, when a battle broke out between the Colorado National Guard and striking coal miners at their tent colony outside of Ludlow in Las Animas County . Nobody knows who fired the first shot, but the incident is remembered as a massacre because...

Lynching in Colorado

Added by yongli on 11/19/2015 - 16:13, last changed on 08/26/2017 - 16:15
Lynching, a form of vigilante punishment involving mob execution, has an active history in Colorado. Between 1859 and 1919, Coloradans carried out 175 lynchings. Lynching is usually associated with the Reconstruction Era in the American South, but before Colorado’s statehood in 1876, lynching was...

New Deal in Colorado

Added by yongli on 08/03/2016 - 13:44, last changed on 08/29/2017 - 08:06
As the United States entered the third year of a great economic depression triggered by the 1929 stock market crash, many Americans put their hope in President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and his pledge to give them a “new deal.” During his first term (1933–37), he pushed Congress to pass legislation...

Spanish Exploration in Southeastern Colorado, 1590–1790

Added by yongli on 09/01/2015 - 14:45, last changed on 09/06/2017 - 01:07
The Spanish effort to conquer and control the lands that would eventually become southeastern Colorado tended to be slow and methodical. The lands claimed by New Spain extended from Panama to the Arctic, although the capital was located in Mexico City. Gradually, rumors of riches in the area of...

Spanish Exploration in Western Colorado

Added by yongli on 07/28/2015 - 11:09, last changed on 09/17/2017 - 01:07
The Spanish colony of New Mexico was founded in 1598. Until 1821, Colorado was part of the extensive Spanish territories governed by the colony. These territories extended far to the north of the New Mexico capital in Santa Fé. In the sixteenth century and later, some Spaniards explored the Great...

Spring Creek Flood of 1997

Added by yongli on 10/22/2015 - 13:14, last changed on 09/18/2017 - 01:07
On July 28, 1997, the city of Fort Collins was inundated with the heaviest rains ever recorded in a Colorado urban area. During the peak of the storm, about six inches fell in an hour and a half. This caused Spring Creek, a tributary of the Cache la Poudre River , to rise thirty feet beyond its...

Telluride Flood of 1914

Added by yongli on 03/31/2017 - 14:59, last changed on 08/31/2017 - 07:25
On July 27, 1914, Telluride experienced several days of severe flooding following a cloudburst in the mountains above town. Remarkably, the destructive deluge killed only one person, and Telluride made a swift recovery, demonstrating the resilience of one of Colorado’s busiest mountain mining towns...

The Bloody Espinosas

Added by yongli on 04/27/2017 - 10:42, last changed on 08/31/2017 - 07:25
The so-called Bloody Espinosas were two brothers—some contend they were cousins—and a nephew who terrorized southern Colorado in the early 1860s. On their vengeful rampage, Felipe, Vivian, and José Espinosa killed dozens of people and remain Colorado’s most prolific serial killers. Today, the...

The Dust Bowl

Added by yongli on 05/09/2016 - 10:53, last changed on 09/02/2017 - 01:07
In the 1930s, eastern Colorado experienced the worst ecological disaster in the state’s history. Unsustainable farming practices and widespread drought transformed the once fertile Great Plains into a barren landscape, inhospitable to both humans and animals. The experience of the Dust Bowl...

The First National Western Stock Show

Added by yongli on 08/03/2016 - 10:56, last changed on 08/31/2017 - 07:25
The origins of Denver ’s annual National Western Stock Show, today one of the city’s biggest tourism draws, date to 1898, a time when American cities competed for the attention of various national organizations in the hope of hosting conventions to bring in revenue. The first stock show helped...

The Fur Trade in Colorado

Added by yongli on 10/30/2015 - 13:26, last changed on 09/17/2017 - 01:07
The trading of animal skins has been a prominent activity throughout the known human occupation of Colorado. These skins—as hides, furs, or robes—provided protection from the elements as well as a valuable commodity traded for economic gain; their trade strengthened and maintained political...

The Hilltop Bomber Crash

Added by yongli on 01/18/2017 - 13:56, last changed on 08/31/2017 - 07:25
In 1951, a B-29 Superfortress taking off from Lowry Air Force Base crashed in Denver’s Hilltop neighborhood. As the smoke cleared, the deadly crash illustrated the need for better safety procedures at military bases near residential areas and the necessity of regulating the expansion of military...

The Sugar Beet Industry

Added by yongli on 11/02/2015 - 16:15, last changed on 08/31/2017 - 07:32
Today sugar beet production is a small part of Colorado’s economy, but in the twentieth century it was the most important agricultural activity in the state. Of more than twenty sugar-refining factories, most built between 1899 and 1920, only the Fort Morgan factory remains in operation. In recent...

The “Nude” Silks-Fulton Duel

Added by yongli on 09/21/2016 - 14:28, last changed on 08/31/2017 - 07:32
The so-called Nude Duel was a legend that sprouted from a drunken brawl involving two well-known madams—Mattie Silks and Kate Fulton—at Denver Gardens in 1877. Although the original accounts of the fight are hardly remarkable, the story took on a life of its own thanks to the diligent exaggerations...

Treaty of Fort Wise

Added by yongli on 08/21/2015 - 16:14, last changed on 09/01/2017 - 01:07
The Treaty of Fort Wise was an agreement between the US government and the Cheyenne and Arapaho people who lived on the western Great Plains in present-day Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, and Wyoming. The treaty was signed in 1861 and reduced the territorial lands previously granted to the Cheyenne and...

Wichita State University Plane Crash

Added by yongli on 10/03/2016 - 12:07, last changed on 08/31/2017 - 08:08
In early October 1970, a twin-engine aircraft carrying forty people associated with the Wichita State University football team crashed into Mt. Bethel along Colorado’s Continental Divide , killing thirty-one passengers. The crash spurred the Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) to review and revise its...
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