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Rocky Mountain National Park

  • Longs Peak Sunrise

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    At 14,259 feet, Longs Peak is the tallest mountain and only fourteener in Rocky Mountain National Park. The peak is named for Major Stephen Long, who is said to be the first to spot the great mountains on behalf of the U.S. Government on June 30, 1820.
    Longs Peak Sunrise
  • Male Mule Deer

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    Mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) are very common in Rocky Mountain National Park. They are smaller than the white-tailed deer and have a black-tipped white tail and white patch on the rump. Male mule deers have forked antlers.
    Male Mule Deer
  • Mule deer on tundra

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    An mule deer grazing on Tundra Communities Trail in Rocky Mountain National Park. Tundra Communities Trail
    Mule deer on tundra
  • Mule Deer in Rocky Mountain National Park

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    Mule deer often can be seen on tundra by Trail Ridge Road. This photo was taken on Tundra Communities Trail highest point, where elevation is 12,285 Feet.
    Mule Deer in Rocky Mountain National Park
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References: 

C. W. Buchholtz, Rocky Mountain National Park: A History (Boulder: University Press of Colorado, 1983).

Jerry J. Frank, Making Rocky Mountain National Park: The Environmental History of an American Treasure (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2013).

Gerald M. Richmond, Raising the Roof of the Rockies: A Geologic History of the Mountains and of the Ice Age in Rocky Mountain National Park (Rocky Mountain Nature Association, 1974.

Additional Information: 

Learn About the Park,” Rocky Mountain National Park, National Park Service.

Mary Taylor Young, Rocky Mountain National Park: The First 100 Years (Helena, MT: Farcountry Press, 2014).

William Philpott, Vacationland: Tourism and Environment in the Colorado High Country (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2013).

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