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Glen Eyrie

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  • Original Glen Eyrie Residence

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    In 1871 Colorado Springs founder William Jackson Palmer built his first residence at Glen Eyrie, a large clapboard house with more than twenty rooms.
    Original Glen Eyrie Residence
  • Palmer at Glen Eyrie

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    Palmer and his wife, known as Queen, occupied the original Glen Eyrie residence only sporadically in the 1870s and 1880s because Palmer often traveled for work and Queen was confined to lower elevations because of a heart condition.
    Palmer at Glen Eyrie
  • Renovated Glen Eyrie Castle

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    After selling the Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad in 1901, Palmer retired from active business and undertook extensive renovations to Glen Eyrie, transforming the house into a stone castle with sixty-seven rooms.
    Renovated Glen Eyrie Castle
  • Book Hall

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    The largest and most impressive room in the renovated Glen Eyrie castle was Book Hall, which could hold 300 people and had a balcony where an orchestra could perform.
    Book Hall

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References: 

DeRos Hogue and Rhoda Wilcox, “Glen Eyrie,” National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form (1974).

Scott Rappold, “History Lives on at Glen Eyrie Castle, the Colorado Springs Spiritual Retreat with an Often-Rocky Past,” Colorado Springs Gazette, November 3, 2013.

Marshall Sprague, Newport in the Rockies: The Life and Good Times of Colorado Springs, 4th ed. (Athens, OH: Swallow Press, 1987).

Additional Information: 

John S. Fisher, A Builder of the West: The Life of General William Jackson Palmer (Caldwell, ID: Caxton Printers, 1939).

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